News and articles about how micropollutants are impacting the health and wellbeing of people in the U.S. and around the world.

Apr 26, 2018 - North Carolina water utility serving 200,000 customers water containing industrial chemicals

A public water utility studied what it was serving to its 200,000 North Carolina customers and found it contained multiple unregulated industrial chemicals with uncertain health effects, including some substances that university researchers didn't know existed, legislators learned Thursday. State lawmakers heard from chemists at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and a top executive of the Wilmington area's main water utility as they try to figure out how the state should respond to rising concern about the prevalence of untested chemicals in drinking water.
Read the New York Times article.

Mar 12, 2018 - New Hampshire to determine scope of PFAS contamination

In New Hampshire, contamination from perfluorinated chemicals, specifically perfluorooctanic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), has been associated with industrial sources found in Merrimack and Litchfield, among other communities. The contaminants have also been recorded in high levels in well water at the former Pease Air Force Base in Portsmouth, and at a landfill straddling two of five towns that are part of a known cancer cluster on the Seacoast. Read More at SentinelSource

Mar 9, 2018 - The Tainted Water Crisis In Upstate New York

The City of Newburgh’s desperate bid to eliminate the PFOA contaminating its water could radically change the way New York regulates water, and create major problems for the military. PFOS has been linked to cancer, thyroid problems and chronic kidney disease, and can accelerate puberty, delay mammary gland development, lower sperm count and raise cholesterol.  Read more at the HuffPost

Feb 8, 2018 - Wolverine spending up to $40 million to address PFAS contamination

KENT COUNTY, MI -- Wolverine Worldwide says it expects to spend about $40 million toward the Rockford area's PFAS water contamination issue over several years, including 2017. Wolverine officials announced the funding amount Thursday, Feb. 8 in a news release. Company officials said they are budgeting $40 million -- $30 million to $35 million in the fourth quarter of 2017 to go toward ongoing testing and monitoring, bottled water for residents and in-home filtration systems and another $8 million to $12 million for 2018 consulting and legal fees and other expenses.
Read the article on Michigan Live.

Feb 2. 2018 - Rockford well may have the highest PFAS level in the U.S.

According to toxicology experts familiar with PFAS, 58,930 parts per trillion (ppt) combined PFOS and PFOA is believed to be highest level of those two chemicals found in drinking water anywhere in the country -- possibly the world.
Read More at Michigan Live

Feb 1, 2018 - Groundwater Contamination Found at Westchester County Airport

Westchester has discovered groundwater contamination at the county airport, with officials suspecting it was caused by chemicals used in firefighting foam decades ago. Preliminary results from one monitoring well, located near a former Air National Guard septic field, found contaminants in concentrations that were 14 times the limit set by the US Environmental Protection Agency health advisory.
Read More at lohud

Nov 24, 2017 - Miles From Flint, Residents Turn Off Taps in New Water Crisis

PLAINFIELD CHARTER TOWNSHIP, MI -- They found pollutants in the water at the National Guard armory in June. Then contractors showed up to test nearby residents’ wells, many of which were also tainted. Soon, people from several miles around were turning off their taps and even brushing their teeth with bottled water. Panic over the water in this part of western Michigan seems to grow by the day.

Read the NY Times article.
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